Core (Required) Courses in Exercise Physiology

These classes must be taken by all graduate students.

EXSS 700 – Applied Statistics and Research Methods in Exercise and Sport Science (3 credit hours)

Selected research techniques and designs, with emphasis on planning, conducting, and reporting of research; applied statistical analysis and interpretation of data from the field of exercise and sport science. Prerequisite: General undergraduate statistics course. Fall.

EXSS 705 – Applied Statistics and Research Methods Laboratory (3 credit hours)

Thesis and statistics comp. exam preparation via practical experience in reviewing, planning and reporting/writing of research. Applied statistical analysis and interpretation and presentation of data from the field of exercise and sport science. Prerequisite: EXSS 700. Spring.

EXSS 780 – Physiology of Exercise (3 credit hours)

The application of physiological principles relevant to the effect of exercise on human functioning. Emphasis is placed on collection and evaluation of experimental data. Laboratory work shall be conducted in facilities provided by the Department of Exercise and Sport Science and the Medical School. Prerequisites: Undergraduate human anatomy, physiology, and exercise physiology. Fall.

EXSS 783 – Assessment of Physiological Functions in Exercise (3 credit hours)

Theories and laboratory techniques for assessing human physiological responses to exercise and training. Simultaneous enrollment with EXSS 780 is required. Fall.

EXSS 784 – Advanced Topics in Exercise Physiology (3 credit hours)

An exploration of the principles of exercise physiology related to children, the elderly, cancer patients; as well as other topics related to faculty research. Prerequisite: EXSS 780. Spring. All exercise physiology faculty.

EXSS 785 – Seminar in Exercise Physiology (3 credit hours)

In-depth study of selected advanced topics in exercise physiology. Emphasis on metabolism, biochemical, and cardiorespiratory physiology with presentations on selected topics by expert guest lecturers. Fall. Exercise Physiology Faculty.

EXSS 993 – Master’s Thesis (5-6 credit hours)

All UNC graduate students are required to take a minimum of 5 credit hours of thesis work with a maximum of 6 permitted. The credit hours are usually divided between the final two semesters of course work, i.e., during the 2nd year. All UNC graduate students are required to be registered for 3 thesis credit hours during the semester in which they defend. Thesis credit hours are usually divided up between the fall and spring semesters as follows: 3 credits in the fall to propose the thesis idea and 3 credits during the spring in order to defend and graduate in May. Only in rare circumstances does a student register for 2 thesis credit hours – this must be discussed in advance with your advisor and can only be done for the proposal phase. For more information about thesis requirements, students are to refer to the EXSS Graduate Handbook.

EXSS 990 – Research in Exercise and Sport Science (1-3 credit hours).

Independent research study arranged by the student with a sponsoring faculty member.

POTENTIAL SELECTIVES

Up to 6 credit hours can be taken as “selectives” to complement educational goals and/or academic needs. broadening one’s academic preparedness will pay dividends for your career pathway. Only one 400 level course is permitted.

Listed below is only a sample of potential courses a student can elect to take from within the EXSS Department or in other departments on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Please note that selectives outside of the EXSS Department require advance planning and often special permission from the instructor and/or department. Successfully enrolled EXSS graduate students contacted the assigned instructors and/or department chair of the specific department during their first semester (Fall) or early during their second semester (Spring). Once granted special permission to enroll in a course, dropping the course is strongly discouraged. We encourage students to take on the challenge and work hard to remain academically competitive. Courses taken during the summer sessions may not be covered by T.A. tuition remission benefits.

Exercise and Sport Science

EXSS 410 – Exercise Testing and Prescription (4 credit hours)

Students must take laboratory section along with class. This is an upper division undergraduate course designed to provide the theoretical and practical knowledge in basic exercise testing and prescription for both healthy and select special populations.  Prerequisites: EXSS 175, 276, 376.  Grading status:  Letter grade

EXSS 479 – Performance Enhancement Specialist (1 credit hour)

The Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES) course is designed for students in the allied health professions interested in creating individualized, integrated training programs. Can lead to certification as a Performance enhancement Specialist by the National Academy of Sports Medicine. By permission of instructor. Spring.

EXSS 732 – Anatomy (4 credit hours)

Dissection of human cadavers with emphasis placed on the functional and clinical aspects of the neck, back and extremities as related to athletic injuries. Restricted enrollment by special permission only. Fall.

EXSS 781 – Clinical Exercise Prescription and Testing (2 credit hours)

This course concentrates on the knowledge and skills necessary for providing exercise testing and prescription in the clinical setting for various clinical conditions.  May include a 12-15 hour rotation at a local clinical site for clinical exercise testing/training experience. Prerequisites: EXSS 376 and 410 (or similar courses) or 780 or permission of instructor. Spring alternating years.

EXSS 782 – Nutritional Aspects of Exercise (2 credit hours)

Exploration of the role of macronutrients and micronutrients as they apply to exercise, physical conditioning, and competition. Students obtain experience in dietary analysis as it applies to athletic populations. Prerequisite/Corequisite: EXSS 780. Spring alternating years.

EXSS 789 – Practicum in Exercise Physiology (3 credit hours)

The implementation of theories and practices in a wide variety of professional settings in the RDU area and elsewhere under the direction of a competent practitioner. Prerequisites: 2nd year grad students only. Permission of instructor. Fall.

Biostatistics

BIOS 600 – Principles of Statistical Inference (3 credit hours)

Major topics include elementary probability theory, probability distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, chi-squared procedures, regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic descriptive statistics. Fall and spring. Long, Hamer, Monaco, Bowling.

Epidemiology

EPID 600 – Principles of Epidemiology (3 credit hours)

An introductory epidemiology course that considers the meaning, scope and applications of epidemiology to public health practice. One lecture and two lab hours per week. For prerequisites/permission, contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration. Fall and spring. Schoenbach, Alexander.

EPID 620 (604) – Aging and Health (3 credit hours)

Aging Introduction to normal aging, diseases of aging, mental health issues and the use of health services by older persons. For prerequisites/permission, contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration. Semester offered varies. Zimmerman.

EPID 735 – Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology (3 credit hours)

Review of the main causes of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality, and their population determinants. Topics include epidemiologic methods, risk factors, strategies for prevention, and a student research project. Corequisites: introductory epidemiology and biostatistics. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration. Fall. Heiss

EPID 772 – Cancer Prevention and Control Seminar (3 credit hours)

An interdisciplinary overview of cancer prevention and control. Emphasis on projects and activities from perspectives of epidemiology, health behavior and education, and Health Policy and Management. Appropriate research design and methodologies will be covered. Fall. O‚Malley.

Nutrition

NUTR 600 – Human Metabolism: Macronutrients (3 credit hours)

Covers normal cell biochemistry and physiology, emphasizing roles of nutrients throughout the life cycle; chemistry and metabolism of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids; endocrine/neuroendocrine regulation of metabolism. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for more information regarding prerequisites and semester offering.

NUTR 696 – Introduction to Obesity: From Cell to Society

The course is designed to provide a broad survey of obesity research, including measurement issues, biological, health and economic consequences, and prevention and treatment of obesity. Course listing (Nutr 696) on nutrition website is generic. Contact the department at least one semester prior to desired registration for more information regarding prerequisites and semester offering.

NUTR 810 – Physical Activity Epidemiology and Public Health (3 credit hours)

Provides and over view of major issues in physical activity measurement, population distribution, correlates, impacts and public health recommendations. Prerequisites: EPID 600. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration. Semester offered varies. Evenson, Ward.

NUTR 813 – Nutritional Epidemiology (3 credit hours)

Introduces basic methods of dietary assessment, reviews various topics in nutrition epidemiology and teaches the skills needed for critical evaluation of the nutritional epidemiologic literature. Prerequisites: EPID 600 and BIOS 600 or equivalent. Contact the department at least one semester prior to desired registration. Spring. Staff.

NUTR 814 – Obesity Epidemiology (3 credit hours)

Examines epidemiologic research on the causes, consequences, and prevention of obesity. Emphasis on methodologic issues pertinent to obesity research. Prerequisites: EPID 600 and BIOS 600. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for permission. Spring. Stevens.

Health Behavior and Health Education Courses

HBHE 600 – Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health (2 credit hours)

This course focuses on social and behavioral science theories, research, and interventions aimed at promoting health of individuals, groups, communities, and populations. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for permission. Spring, Summer, Fall. Golden. Syllabus

HBHE 660 – Medical Journalism (3 credit hours)

Prepares students to work as medical journalists for a variety of media, including print, broadcast, and the Internet. The course emphasizes writing skills and interpreting medical information for consumers. Prerequisite: JOMC 450 or permission of instructor. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for permission. Fall. Linden. Syllabus

HBHE 661 – Medical Reporting for Electronic Media (3 credit hours)

Teaches students how to conceive, script, report, and produce medical stories for electronic media, especially television. Students work in teams to produce projects for professional media outlets. Prerequisite: HBHE 660 or permission of instructor. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for permission. Fall. Linden.

HBHE 700 – Introduction to Public Health & Public Health Education (2 credits)

This course offers an introduction to public health, history of public health and public health education, and a focus on population health/social determinants of health and an introduction to global health. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for permission Fall. Siddiqi. Syllabus

HBHE 772 – Planning Health Promotion in Community, Worksite, School, and Medical Settings (3 credit hours)

In this course students use a comprehensive planning model to plan, implement, and evaluate interventions that address a public health issue for a defined population. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for permission Spring. Moracco. Syllabus

HBHE 795– eHealth (3 credit hours)

An overview of the positive and negative impacts of the Internet on public health. Covers research, evaluation sites, ethics, and use of theory that addresses key public health problems. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for permission. Fall. Ribisl. Syllabus

Human Biology

436 – Endocrinology (3 credit hours)

Principles of neuroendocrine and endocrine systems of vertebrates and selected invertebrates with consideration of the anatomy and physiology of glands of internal secretion. Hormone chemistry and interendocrine relationships are also emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or 252. Contact the department at least one semester prior to desired registration for special permission. Staff.

445 – Cancer Biology (3 credit hours)

Selected examples will be used to illustrate how basic research allows us to understand the mechanistic basis of cancer and how these insights offer hope for new treatments. Prerequisites: BIOL 202 and 205. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for special permission. Staff.

450 – Introduction to Neurobiology (3 credit hours)

Survey of neurobiological principles in vertebrates and invertebrates, including development, morphology, physiology, and molecular mechanisms. Prerequisite recommended: BIOL 205. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for special permission. Staff.

Human Physiology

PHYI 702 – Experimental Physiology of Human Health & Disease (3 credit hours)

Students will learn the principles of cell, organ and systems physiology and pathophysiology required to identify important areas of current biomedical research. A system approach will be taken (neuro, cardiovascular, etc.) but with a strong emphasis on model systems, and use of disease examples (channelopathies, schizophrenia, hypertension, diabetes, etc) and current research opportunities. Lectures are complemented by demonstrations of methods in physiologic research which highlight current research in the department including, for example, optical imaging of morpholino-induced vascular malformation in zebrafish, patch clamping and in vivo quantification of blood flow in mouse models. . Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for special permission. Fall. Anderson, staff.

Organ System Physiology  A Systems Approach Collection of Sequential Courses.  Special permission. For advanced physiology students. Contact required very early to set sequence up:

PHYI 712A – Organ System Physiology in Health and Disease: Gastrointestinal and Endocrine Physiology (2.credit hours)

This section will use a combination of overview lectures, textbook or syllabus reading assignments and current research papers for class discussion and emphasize the clinical application of the basic science presented. Endocrine (5 sessions): This segment will examine a) the hypothalamic pituitary relationship (especially thyroid and prolactin control); b) negative and positive feedback of steroids emphasizing current research on kisspeptins; c) sexual development and differentiation, featuring current research on “female is not the default sex”; and d) insulin secretion and mode of action, the role of hypothalamic pyruvate / lactate in glucose production by the liver and clinical relevance of these findings in the potential therapy in Type II diabetes mellitus Gastrointestinal (10 sessions): The gastrointestinal tract interfaces with the endocrine system and metabolic organs to regulate nutrient utilization and storage. The gastrointestinal epithelium is one of the most rapidly and constantly renewing organ systems. Constant epithelial renewal is essential for normal digestion and absorption of nutrients, and maintains the epithelial barrier against microorganisms and toxins. Gastrointestinal diseases that impair epithelial renewal or integrity are responsible for millions of deaths each year. Increasing evidence indicates that endogenous intestinal microorganisms (microbiota) are critical to normal intestinal function. This course segment will take a disease-oriented format focused on intestinal growth colon cancer and obesity to illustrate the elegance and clinical importance of this organ system. Material covered will include: a) an overview of the structure, function of the gastrointestinal tract and mechanisms of epithelial renewal in health and disease; b) an overview and original new research on intestinal stem cells and their role in healing, tissue regeneration or aberrant growth during disease states such as radiation or chemotherapy induced injury, and cancer; c) an overview of the normal intestinal microbial community (microbiota) and its roles in intestinal epithelial renewal, inflammation, and nutrient metabolism; and d) original research on how the intestinal microbiota regulates intestinal physiology and disease and provide potential new therapeutic strategies for bowel disease and obesity. . Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for special permission. Lund, Rawls, Anderson, Falvo.

PHYI 712B – Organ System Physiology in Health and Disease: Cardiovascular and Renal Physiology (2 credit hours)

An ~18 session course on the basic physiology of the kidney and cardiovascular systems, their interactions, and their regulation. Aspects of normal physiology are extensively highlighted by discussion of human diseases. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for special permission.Sealock, Edwards.

PHYI 712C – Organ System Physiology in Health and Disease: Respiration (1 credit hour)

A 10-12 session course that begins with the basic physiology of respiration and gas transport, then applies that understanding to in-depth discussions of common, devastating respiratory diseases. Format is lecture plus journal club. Contact the instructor at least one semester prior to desired registration for special permission. Randell, Sealock.

Other courses per student’s goals & academic advisor approval.